Say No to Porn

Say no to porn. Though most readers of this article would audibly agree with this statement, we as Christians like to hold our sins close to our hearts. We may outwardly speak against porn, but oftentimes our own habits show that we have deceived ourselves. We outcry against the 50 different shades of sexual movies yearly released that degrade men, women, and children. We tell the world to flee sexual immorality in their novels and manga. Yet series like Game of Thrones and Orange is the new Black are saved on our watchlist. We cry “I skip the bad scenes” as we inadvertently  glimpse x rated images for a split second before fast forwarding. Of course, even fast forwarding doesn’t work, since the one fast forwarding has to peek to know where to begin playing again.

There are others who decide not to watch Game of Thrones because the show promotes sin. But what about when we walk past Victoria’s Secrets, drive past the beach, or scroll past the “Russian women want local men” ads?

Paul says “not even a hint” yet we hint with not even a care. When Paul tells us to flee sexual immorality and says that there is instead to be “thanksgiving”, he did not mean that we were to be thankful for the crass joking, rude gestures, inappropriate storylines, hyper-sexualized drawing in comic books, or women who wear yoga pants.

We may tell popes and priests, presidents and kings to cease and desists their wicked ways—but if we regard sin in our own hearts, why do we expect God to bless the fruit of our labor? In terms of national repentance, God says that it is HIS people who must first repent for the blessings on the nation to follow (2 Chron 7:14). We cry “murder” at abortion clinics, “injustice” capital buildings, and “immorality” at gay rights parades, but our Youtube and Reddit history betray our own statements.

How can we be surprised that reformation hasn’t happened in America when we partake with unbelievers in every carnal sin? It is not they who must first repent but us. We must repent from not only the grossly blatant immorality that we act on but also the secret immorality. We must continually repent of the hints, looks, hopes, desires, and affections we have that are contrary to the word of God. Not only this, but we are also called to action to run from what will cause us to sin. This means that we must also clear our homes of books, comics, DVD’s, pictures and any other things that continually lead us into temptation.

Though it is wise to care about what you watch on a laptop in the privacy of your home, it would be wiser to create a lifestyle wherein saying “yes” is much more difficult. You can run from your laptop at midnight all you want, but when you do not address the proverbial foxes who spoil the vineyard, you will have little hope of success (Song 2:15). So what steps are you going to take in order to avoid this habit?

When was the last time you had a quiet time? Are you reading Scripture every day? Are you setting time aside to intentionally pray? You probably know your patterns of failure, so what can change to cut the pattern? Are there shows or movies you can remove from your life to help you flee temptation? If you are a husband, are you protecting your household from sin by acting as a godly federal head? Do you realize that as the federal head, you can quickly bring judgment on your entire household with your sin? Do you know that God is certainly able to both forgive you of your sin and also to deliver you from it?

Though there can be one large habit to break, oftentimes it is a lot of smaller habits that lead us to temptation. We must be vigilant at recognizing these habits before it is too late.

“Catch the foxes for us, The little foxes that are ruining the vineyards, while our vineyards are in blossom.” -Song of Solomon 2:15

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4 thoughts on “Say No to Porn

  1. Infolded Truisms

    Is the sin being tempted by these things or just seeing content that makes you, the author of this article, think of sinning? I believe, as many christians believe, that I am not drawn to sin by simply, in your own words, “driving by the beach.” Am I allowed to read comic books or engage in jokes with my friends if I am not drawn to commit sexual sin by them? Many christians are completely fine with watching violent movies, but no where in this article do you condemn those bits of media. How is it that seeing “women who wear yoga pants” is a sin but watching a movie where people are slaughtered by the thousands (e.g. Lord of the Rings) is not?

    If your answer is that you are not drawn to commit the sin of killing simply by seeing that kind of content, but you are drawn to sexual sin by seeing other content, you need to ask yourself why. Why do you make the assertion we must block out all of this kind of sin temptations but not of this other kind?

    Then where does this slippery slope stop? Do you black out your windows for fear you’ll begin to covet your neighbor’s possessions if you see them? Do you wear ear plugs at the park for fear you’ll be drawn to dishonor your mother or father because you heard a child talk back?

    I bet you find that absurd because you are not tempted to sin from seeing those things. Most other people are not drawn to commit sexual sin by walking through the mall, as you apparently are.

    You cannot resign yourself to staying home forever for fear you might see a superman comic book.

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    1. //Is the sin being tempted by these things or just seeing content that makes you, the author of this article, think of sinning?//
      Temptation is not a sin, as Jesus was tempted and did not sin. (Heb 4:15)

      //I believe, as many christians believe, that I am not drawn to sin by simply, in your own words, “driving by the beach.”// This is good. I am glad you feel the freedom to do such. However, I have been astounded at the many Christian men I know who gawk at women unashamedly at the beach.

      //Am I allowed to read comic books or engage in jokes with my friends if I am not drawn to commit sexual sin by them?// My article never condemned either of these but I am ashamed at Christian men who recommend comic books littered with images that go much further than ‘not even a hint’.

      //Many christians are completely fine with watching violent movies, but no where in this article do you condemn those bits of media// Because the article is titled “Say No to Porn”. A later article on “Say No to Warmongering” is certainly in the works though.

      //How is it that seeing “women who wear yoga pants” is a sin but watching a movie where people are slaughtered by the thousands (e.g. Lord of the Rings) is not?// I never said it wasn’t.

      //If your answer is that you are not drawn to commit the sin of killing simply by seeing that kind of content, but you are drawn to sexual sin by seeing other content, you need to ask yourself why.// Why?

      //Why do you make the assertion we must block out all of this kind of sin temptations but not of this other kind?// I didn’t.

      //Then where does this slippery slope stop?// How did we get on a slope?

      //Do you black out your windows for fear you’ll begin to covet your neighbor’s possessions if you see them?// This is just getting silly…

      //Do you wear ear plugs at the park for fear you’ll be drawn to dishonor your mother or father because you heard a child talk back?// more silliness

      //I bet you find that absurd because you are not tempted to sin from seeing those things.// No I find it absurd because you’re working off of presuppositions so far down the rabbit hole that I’m having a hard time finding my way back to Mr McGregor’s garden.

      //Most other people are not drawn to commit sexual sin by walking through the mall, as you apparently are.// When did I say I was?

      //You cannot resign yourself to staying home forever for fear you might see a superman comic book.// I think it’s obvious to any who read your comment that you’ve worked off of assumptions from a hypothetical conversation we never had. If you would, however, like to critique what I actually claimed in the article, I would welcome it gladly.

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  2. Infolded Truisms

    Caleb, thank you for prompt response. I appreciate it.

    My main arguments were based around these two points of yours:

    1. “There are others who decide not to watch Game of Thrones because the show promotes sin. But what about when we walk past Victoria’s Secrets, drive past the beach, or scroll past the ‘Russian women want local men’ ads?”
    2. “We must also clear our homes of books, comics, DVD’s, pictures and any other things that continually lead us into temptation.”

    If Game of Thrones promotes sin the same way as a popular retail store what am I supposed to do when walking through the mall? I can avoid shows you deem pornographic, but in my daily life I see things you have placed at the same level of sin temptation in your article. Forgive me if I am conflating, but I understand your point here is that watching game of thrones promotes sin the same way my walking by a store promotes sin. In my opinion, it is unrealistic to constrain my life in such in a way that I may never encounter one of the things that “lead[s] us into temptation.” In fact, I do not agree that the things you mentioned lead most people into temptation. And if I am continually led into temptation by seemingly mundane things like shopping, driving, and reading, perhaps the problem is with myself and not with stores in the mall, people at the beach, or literature.

    Your rebuttal to the point, why are you only focused on sexual sin here, is a fair one and I look forward to your article on violence.

    You are correct that it was wrong of me to assume you are not tempted to the sin of killing by watching violent imagery. The question I have now then is do you find yourself tempted to commit murder by seeing violence in “books, comics, DVD’s, pictures, [etc.]” the same way you are tempted to sexual sin by seeing instances of it in those same media formats?

    If not, why not? If so, what should be done to not be tempted?

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    1. Hey brother, I think you make some very good points. I may have been vague with my intention with the article which was mostly to address the men who only respond to sin after it happens rather than set up safeguards before they happen. So it was written in such a way so as to give a general set of questions to men so they can truly examine whether or not they need to ditch a hobby, habit, or hang-out-place for the sake of their family, friends, and even their own faith.

      When I speak to men on sexual sin, they are shocked that they fell into it. Yet when they examine their own lifestyle, they see that there were the proverbial foxes in their lifestyle that they should have sought to exterminate. I was not attempting to conflate but rather address all men from all lifestyles. While some men may struggle with hardcore explicit videos, others sneak into their closet with a sears magazine. This is not to say that the man who watches the videos shouldn’t throw out his skivvy periodical. But it does mean that he needs to truly examine the source of his sin.

      I am more concerned with the temptations that men face every single day and in constructing a lifestyle to avoid them, rather than the idea that we should walk around with a blindfold in case of the off chance that maybe perhaps we might come into a circumstance with temptation. We all will face temptation. My question is: are we walking as cows led to slaughter or as soldiers to the battle?

      Speaking of soldiers… since the subject keeps coming up: Violence should not be watched, rejoiced in, or participated in unless lawfully approved by Scripture. Some examples of these are just war (only defensive), the death penalty (if it is true justice), God destroying a nation personally (Sodom and Gomorrah). So I am not okay with things like Faces of Death, Liveleak death videos, and movies like 300 that sexualize gore and warmongering.

      Like

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